Fostering NGO's and frontline responders' engagement

VOICE

What is the

GRAND BARGAIN?

The original vision of the Grand Bargain was to negotiate an agreement between the largest donors and main implmenting humanitairan agencies to help address the “trust deficit” in the sector and increase the efficiency and effectiveness of humanitarian aid delivery.

The Grand Bargain and its set of commitments were officially launched during the World Humanitarian Summit in May 2016 and has since then been endorsed by more than 50 humanitarian donors and aid agencies.

Two years after its launch the Grand Bargain significant progresses have been made in relation to the implementation of the 51 commitments and there remains strong consensus among signatories that the Grand Bargain is acting as a catalyst for institutional and systemwide change. For NGOs the Grand Bargain offers a unique opportunity since among the 10 inital workstreams many relate to issues NGOs are directly affected with: be it in relation to donors conditionalities (e.g on reporting, multi-year planning and funding) or issues linked to quality and modality of aid delivery (e.g on participation of affected population, localisation of aid, cash programming).

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”Our goal over the next five years is to bring an additional billion dollars into the hands of people in dire need of live-saving help, by making efficiency savings on the backroom activities of donors and aid organisations. In the space of a few months, we have been able to negotiate a deal between major players in the humanitarian ecosystem – a deal addressing issues that have hindered and hampered life-saving work for years.” – May 2016

Kristalina Georgieva

The 10 Grand Bargain workstreams

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  1. 1
    Greater Transparency

    Evidence available for 2017 indicates that there has been very good progress against commitment 1.1, which the workstream consciously decided to focus on at an early stage. More and more signatories are publishing open data on their humanitarian financing. But there remain some differences of opinion on the IATI standard and there has been less progress on the political or policy issues that are required to drive systemic change.

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  2. 2
    More support and funding tools to local and national responders

    One of the most prominent and important messages emerging from WHS was that if more capacity, power, respect, resources, space and voice is given to national and local actors within the humanitarian system, we can improve the results and services delivered to the people in needs. The workstream has tried to coordinate a series of relevant research initiatives on this agenda to ensure that we are all on the same page, maximise coherence and minimise duplication.

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  3. 3
    Increase the use and coordination of cash-based programming

    There has been important progress under this workstream, with reported increases in the use of cash programming, and significant efforts have been made by the co-conveners and participating signatories to capitalise on other processes. Differences remain over how to track cash programming, and there was limited progress on operational coordination.

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  4. 4
    Reduce Duplication and Management costs with periodic functional reviews

    Reduce duplication and management costs with periodic functional reviews has had promising steps, especially due to NGO-led initiatives, on the harmonization of partnership agreements, joint logistic and procurement procedures and transparent and comparable cost structures.

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  5. 5
    Improve Joint and Impartial Needs Assessments

    The Grand Bargain Commitments on Needs Assessments are a mix of assessment outputs (e.g. comprehensive and cross-sectoral), methods and resources to assessments (e.g. transparent, collaborative, shared data, with adequate capacities and independent reviews), and components of assessments (e.g. risks and vulnerability analysis). Through a series of workshops, participants identified a set of priority issues and associated activities. While to date, work has primarily been conceptual in nature, it is envisaged that this work will be more field focused in the latter half of 2018.

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  6. 6
    A Participation Revolution: include people receiving aid in making the decisions which affect their lives

    We need to include the people affected by humanitarian crises and their communities in our decisions to be certain that the humanitarian response is relevant, timely, effective and efficient. Donors and aid organisations should work to ensure that the voices of the most vulnerable groups considering gender, age, ethnicity, language and special needs are heard and acted upon.

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  7. 7
    Increase collaborative humanitarian multi-year planning and funding

    Increase collaborative humanitarian multi-year planning and funding is one of the workstreams that progressed significantly and positively in the past two years, especially in documenting the impact of multi-year, collaborative and flexible planning and multi-year funding instruments.

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  8. 8
    Reduce the earmarking of donor contributions

    In 2017 important progress was made by the workstream on agreeing a baseline for measuring progress; identifying shared needs and concerns between donors and aid organisations; and understanding different interpretations of what counts as ‘flexible’ funding and where it occurs in the funding chain

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  9. 9
    Harmonize and simplify reporting requirements

    Following an initial stakeholder workshop in November 2016, a decision was made to move forward with a pilot project to test a harmonized donor narrative reporting framework. The two-year pilot was officially launched in June 2017, to run through June 2019.

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  10. 10
    Enhance engagement between humanitarian and development actors

    Since March 2018, the Humanitarian and Development nexus work stream is officially closed. However, some actions are still taking place at a different level and through different processes.

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VOICE engagement in the Grand Bargain Project

VOICE is the main NGO interlocutor with the European Union on emergency aid and disaster risk reduction, and it promotes the values of humanitarian NGOs. It is a network representing 86 non-governmental organisations (NGOs) active in humanitarian aid worldwide.

This present website arises from one of the objectives from VOICE Grand Bargain project which is to raise awareness and facilitate access to relevant information for NGOs and frontline responders in relation to the implementation Grand Bargain.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

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