Fostering NGO's and frontline responders' engagement

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The Grand Bargain Work streams

Where are we at ?

 

This page aims at informing on the main activities and progress made under each Grand Bargain work stream. Each of them is driven by its two co-conveners  (one donor representative and one implementing agency representative) – supported by an NGO-co-champion.

Please click on each work stream webpage to find out why and how to engage in the implementation as well as related events, reports and initiatives.

For official documents and background information on the Grand Bargain, please visit the IASC Grand Bargain official page: https://interagencystandingcommittee.org/grand-bargain-hosted-iasc

 

The 10 Grand Bargain workstreams

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  1. 1
    Greater Transparency

    Evidence available for 2019 indicates that progress continued to be made by and within this workstream in 2018 against commitment 1.1, which the workstream consciously decided to focus on at an early stage. Since June 2017, the number of Grand Bargain signatories that are publishing open data on their humanitarian financing and providing much more useful and usable data on their activities has significantly increased as organisations begin using the humanitarian features of the latest version of the IATI Standard.

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  2. 2
    More support and funding tools to local and national responders

    One of the most prominent and important messages emerging from WHS was that if more capacity, power, respect, resources, space and voice is given to national and local actors within the humanitarian system, we can improve the results and services delivered to the people in needs. Because the volume of crisis globally is too much for international actors alone to cope with, and because in a large number of situations, local people, communities and organisations are best-positioned to help and the first to arrive.

    The workstream has collectively developed best practice papers on six themes relevant to localisation: capacity-strengthening, coordination, donor/intermediary arrangements, financing, gender and partnerships. These will be finalised and published in January 2020 and will represent useful learning material for organisations interested in advancing their localisation practice.

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  3. 3
    Increase the use and coordination of cash-based programming

    In 2019, for the second year running, the Cash work stream has made more progress than the other Grand Bargain workstreams. The Overseas Development Institute (ODI) emphasized that while the high level of energy around cash, and progress associated with it, was largely independent of the Grand Bargain, the work stream acts as an important catalyst, bringing together a range of actors to address key issues. The ODI report welcomed the collaborative approach that has included clear and actionable priorities, defined roles, and targeted efforts to address areas identified as receiving less attention.

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  4. 4
    Reduce Duplication and Management costs with periodic functional reviews

    Reduce duplication and management costs with periodic functional reviews has had promising steps, especially due to NGO-led initiatives, on the harmonization of partnership agreements, joint logistics and procurement procedures and transparent and comparable cost structures. According to the annual independent report (2019), however, the progress remains uneven. On the donors’ front, there has been reluctance to move to reduce individual donor assessments. The co-conveners continued to focus primarily on instituting measures to reduce costs within the UN group, capitalising on UN reform efforts to gain traction on certain commitments.

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  5. 5
    Improve Joint and Impartial Needs Assessments

    The Grand Bargain Commitments on Needs Assessments are a mix of assessment outputs (e.g. comprehensive and cross-sectoral), methods and resources to assessments (e.g. transparent, collaborative, shared data, with adequate capacities and independent reviews), and components of assessments (e.g. risks and vulnerability analysis). Through a series of workshops, participants identified a set of priority issues and associated activities. While to date, work has primarily been conceptual in nature, it is envisaged that this work will be more field focused in the latter half of 2018.

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  6. 6
    A Participation Revolution: include people receiving aid in making the decisions which affect their lives

    We need to include the people affected by humanitarian crises and their communities in our decisions to be certain that the humanitarian response is relevant, timely, effective and efficient. Donors and aid organisations should work to ensure that the voices of the most vulnerable groups considering gender, age, ethnicity, language and special needs are heard and acted upon.

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  7. 7
    Enhanced quality funding through reduced earmarking and multi-year planning and funding

    Former work stream 7 and 8 have merged in 2018 into the work stream 7+8 ‘enhanced quality funding through reduced earmarking and multi-year planning and funding’. This was intended to consolidate efforts against the respective commitments in the two original work streams, to leverage synergies and to facilitate a more integrated approach to flexible and predictable funding.

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  8. 8
    Enhanced quality funding through reduced earmarking and multi-year planning and funding

    Former work stream 7 and 8 have merged in 2018 into the work stream 7+8 ‘enhanced quality funding through reduced earmarking and multi-year planning and funding’. This was intended to consolidate efforts against the respective commitments in the two original work streams, to leverage synergies and to facilitate a more integrated approach to flexible and predictable funding.

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  9. 9
    Harmonize and simplify reporting requirements

    Following an initial stakeholder workshop in November 2016, a decision was made to move forward with a pilot project to test a harmonized donor narrative reporting framework. The harmonizing reporting pilot to test the new 8+3 template began on June 1, 2017 in Iraq, Myanmar and Somalia and ended on May 31, 2019. The pilot has shown that partners view the new template as a significant improvement over existing donor templates since it simplifies and standardizes the reporting process considerably

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  10. 10
    Enhance engagement between humanitarian and development actors

    Since March 2018, the Humanitarian and Development nexus work stream is officially closed. However, some actions are still taking place at a different level and through different processes.

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